Episode 53 – A Poisonous Rainstorm!

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Episode 53- A Poisonous Rainstorm

Guest hosts: Tommy B Smith and Lyle Perez-Tinics

Tommy’s website:

 http://www.tommybsmith.com  

Tommy’s book: Poisonous: http://www.amazon.com/Poisonous-ebook/dp/B008N04TVA

Here is the link to the Reviews Supplement with my article, Violence as Entertainment.

http://issuu.com/morpheustales/docs/18reviews

Following the Quake of ’79, a terrible force came to the city of St. Charles. This was the Living Poison.

In Lilac Chambers, it may have found the perfect host. As she finds herself changing, becoming increasingly dangerous to everyone around her, it becomes apparent that her state of being is no accident of nature. She is becoming a prime vehicle for the Living Poison’s destructive swath through the streets of St. Charles.

Detective Brandt McCullough has seen the Living Poison’s brutality. John Sutterfield, ringmaster of Sutterfield’s Circus of the Fantastic, is discovering its malignancy festering within the very circus he founded. These two are the only ones who might stand in the way of a force greater than anything they have ever known, one which threatens to wash the streets in red and swallow the city into chaos, but the stakes may be higher than either of them can imagine.

St. Charles—indeed, the world—may tremble.

Poisonous grips you tight from the very first sentence and doesn’t let go until the end. Tommy B. Smith writes with the same elegance and poise reminiscent of a young Stephen King.” -Joe Filippone, author of In the Tarot

As far as topics go, there is the new book, of course, and I have also had numerous short stories published in the past. The book, in fact, stemmed from a short story of mine which was published in 2007.

Tommy’s editorial stint with Morpheus Tales Magazine sometime ago, as editor of two of the magazine’s “special” issues, the dark sorcery issue and the urban horror issue. 

 

Prompt

Write about what scares you. What do you fear? Snakes? Pandemic? The Republicans? Write about it and see what happens, from our fears can rise creativity.

Word of the week

BRIMBORION

It’s not a word that rises unbidden to the lips of English speakers today, nor — if the record is to be trusted — at any time. It means a thing without value or use. It was borrowed from French, where it may still be found in dictionaries, though firmly marked as literary. According to the lexicographer Emile Littré, who compiled a famous dictionary of French in the middle decades of the nineteenth century, it’s a bastardised form of the Latin breviarium, the source of breviary for the service book used by Roman Catholic priests.

The link had been explained by another lexicographer two centuries earlier. Randall Cotgrave wrote in his French-English dictionary of 1611 that the word came to mean “foolish charms or superstitious prayers, used by old and simple women against the toothache, and any such threadbare and musty rags of blind devotion”, hence something valueless. A rare appearance is in a letter of 1786 by the writer Fanny Burney, in which she refers to “Talking to your royal mistress, or handing jewels … and brimborions, baubles, knick-knacks, gewgaws”.

It is much less weird in German, in which the closely connected Brimborium, also borrowed from French but given a Latinate ending, is an informal term for an unnecessary fuss. The sentence “du machst viel zu viel Brimborium um eine Kleinigkeit” might be translated as “you’re making a lot of fuss about nothing”.

http://www.worldwidewords.org

Shout outs:

See us on facebook, leave a comment, Catharine is in charge.

http://www.facebook.com/Newbie writers Group

Podcast Awards: http://www.podcastawards.com

Rainstorm Press: http://www/rainstormpress.com

Lyle Perez-Tinics on Twitter: @RainstormPress

Damien: @newbiewriters.

 


 

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