Episode 162 – Lost, Kidnapped And Eaten Alive!

By CBramkamp Newbie Writers Podcast Comments Off on Episode 162 – Lost, Kidnapped And Eaten Alive!

The Newbie Writers’ Podcast

Special Guest: Laurie King


Just to start this out: The kidnapped story in Laurie King’s travel memoir, Lost, Kidnapped, Eaten Alive, is when she accepted a ride from a “very nice” man who, it turned out, was not so nice, and she was rescued by a few locals.

The eaten alive refers to an encounter with a beautiful clear pool of water and hundreds of tiny leeches (in Austraila, had to point that out)

And we didn’t get to the lost story.

The market for Travel writing has changed and Laurie attributes that change to the internet, like pretty much everything else. Her advice to Newbie Writers is to create the articles about your travels, post them, gather a body of work, and then start pitching those articles to magazines or web sites. Money? This is not a way to make a living, not anymore.

We are sorry to bring you this news.

Laurie McAndish King is an award-winning travel writer whose essays have aired on public radio and been published in Lonely PlanetTravelers’ TalesBay Area Travel Writers, and Wanderland Writers literary anthologies. Her story “Silk from Ashes” won a 2013 Lowell Thomas gold award for cultural tourism. Laurie’s articles and photography have also been published in the San Francisco Chronicle Magazine and Smithsonian.

Laurie is a founding member of Left Coast Writers, a board member of Bay Area Travel Writers, and an avid photographer—one of her photos was displayed at the Smithsonian Institution. She publishes an online newsletter, Travel Writers News, with news, information, and links for San Francisco Bay Area travel writers and photographers. Her five-star-rated mobile app about the San Francisco Waterfront is sold on iTunes.

Laurie co-edited two Left Coast Writers anthologies in the Hot Flashes: sexy little stories and poems series, and wrote An Erotic Alphabet, a witty volume of ABCs for adults; for which she was dubbed “The Shel Silverstein of Erotica.”

 

Lost, Kidnapped, Eaten Alive

What happens when a practical midwestern gal sets off to explore the world? Laurie McAndish King’s travels seem innocent in the planning stage, but surprising adventure follows as she finds herself tracking lions on foot and without a gun in Botswana … attempting to eat a horse in southern Italy … searching for an ancient Celtic goddess in Ireland … marrying a Maasai warrior in Kenya … and sampling the world’s most expensive coffee—brewed from the excrement of a small Balinese mammal.

Whether she is lost in downtown Melbourne, kidnapped in the scorching Tunisian desert, or eaten alive by the blood-sucking denizens of tropical north Queensland, King’s stories—quirky, poignant, occasionally unsettling, and often funny—are inspiring and entertaining.

Word of the week:

A.Word.A.Day

with Anu Garg

ultracrepidarian

MEANING:

adjective: Giving opinions beyond one’s area of expertise.
noun: One who gives opinions beyond one’s area of expertise.

ETYMOLOGY:

From Latin ultra (beyond) + crepidarius (shoemaker), from crepida (sandal). Earliest documented use: 1819.

The story goes that in ancient Greece there was a renowned painter named Apelles who used to display his paintings and hide behind them to listen to the comments. Once a cobbler pointed out that the sole of the shoe was not painted correctly. Apelles fixed it and encouraged by this the cobbler began offering comments about other parts of the painting. At this point the painter cut him off with “Ne sutor ultra crepidam” meaning “Shoemaker, not above the sandal” or one should stick to one’s area of expertise.

Prompt:

Write about weird food, either your own that horrifies visitors, or the weird food you’ve either encountered while traveling, or eaten while visiting. I’ve tasted rat, but passed on the tarantula. And I love caviar sandwiches for breakfast. What about you?

Tortured Sentences:

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