Episode 164 – “Book Development With Naomi Rose”

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The Newbie Writers Podcast

 

Our Guest is Naomi Rose

Naomi talked with us about her approach to book coaching. She is more intuitive with her clients, finding that she works with them to uncover their essential message as well as their very essence!

In her words:

A Book Whisperer ~ at your service:

I help you write the book of your heart  by listening to what’s in you,  shining light on your natural creative pathways, and evoking your true voice  so your book rings with the intimate beauty of your own truth.

With over 30 years in the publications field, I offer a wealth of expertise and support.

As we work together, you will:

  • Come to feel held, nurtured, and expertly guided through the terrain of the book that’s knocking at your heart’s door.
  • Develop trust and confidence in your writing.
  • Write with an authoritative, authentic voice.

The result is a book of deep beauty  that transforms your life as well as your readers’.

The book-writing journey can be a rich, soul-healing, and rewarding one.

Come see what’s possible for YOU.

Example of what Naomi does:

WRITING FROM THE DEEPER SELF

Is Really About  RELATIONSHIP

Oh, the blank page! The image of the blank page has kept many a budding writer from picking up her or his pen (or, in our times, mouse).

You know, innately, that there is so much inside you to say: stories, impressions, ideas, evocations that you are secretly bursting with—if only they would show their face. You sense that writing offers a way to wholeness—that the act of seeing deeply into the underlay of your life would bring together those strands that strand you, that keep you feeling separate, and make of your life a meaningful, tapestry-like whole.

Perhaps you intuitively sense the truth of the saying, “Writers get to live twice—once when they have the experience, and again when they get to reflect on it through writing.” Perhaps you even bear the hope that telling your story—no matter what form it’s in, whether fiction, nonfiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, first-person narrative, or even spiritual teaching—will benefit not only you, but those who read you as well.

Perhaps, beyond the desire to put your own world to rights by honoring your journey and coming to know it and cherish it, you desire to bring the fumblings and beauty and sufferings and joys and humanity of your story to the great heart of the world, to lay at its feet, to make the world better because you were here.

And yet that blank page. It is so filled with noise. “I have nothing to say.” “What makes me think that I could write aparagraph, much less a book?” “Who would want to read it?” “There are already so many books on the bookstore shelves. Surely, no one needs another one from me.”

And then there is the noise about know-how. “I need an outline. I need a theme. I need a direction. I need an authoritative voice. I need to do it so that a publisher will accept it. I need time to write. I need discipline. I need to clean my desk, make a phone call, eat something, watch a video, anything but be staring at this merciless blank page!”

And beneath all that blank-page noise lies the core self-doubt, the insidious whisper that doesn’t want to go away on its own: “It isn’t about technique, or time, or even content. It isn’t even about my voice as an author. It’s aboutmeI’m not enough to bring forth anything of value from. At heart, I don’t believe that what I yearn to find within myself is really there.”

And this is where relationship comes in.

Prompt:

What happened before? What was the lead up to your character’s crisis? We have told you over and over to start the book with the crisis moment and fill in the before later. Do that now. Write a whole bunch about your character and what happened before his or her crisis, that moment when the character and the reader meet. Create as much backstory as you want.

Word of the week:

zeugma  PRONUNCIATION: (ZOOG-muh)

MEANING:  noun: The use of a word to refer to two or more words, especially in different senses.

Examples: “He caught a fish and a cold” or “She lost her ring and her temper.”

Tortured Sentences:

Karen Douglas in the Lansing (Mich.) State Journal]

“My future husband has never seen me work so he’s in for a real surprise,” laughed Bach, who is getting married for the third time in 10 days.

Bring out your dead:

Courtesy of Courtney Killian

Shout outs:

Day of the Book is this weekend. Thank you to JFKU for hosting this great event!

Contact Naomi:

http://www.essentialwriting.com./

naomirosedeepwrite@yahoo.com

 


 

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